Solar Energy

  1. The Andrews Labor Government will invest an additional $20 million to support large-scale energy storage initiatives across Victoria, creating jobs, protecting affordability and maintaining the reliability of our energy grid. Premier Daniel Andrews and Minister for Energy and Environment Lily D'A
  2. How do we compensate those who add clean electricity to our shared power grid? This fundamental question has affected the rate at which the U.S. has adopted, deployed, and put into use clean, distributed energy resources.

  3. This week, the largest renewable energy project built in the U.S. through an alliance of diverse buyers reached commercial operation. The development of the 60-MW Summit Farms Solar project was driven by demand from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Boston Medical Center, and Post Office Square Redevelopment Corporation.

     

  4. Imagine a future when solar cells can be sprayed or printed onto the windows of skyscrapers or atop sports utility vehicles -- and at prices potentially far cheaper than today’s silicon-based panels.

    It’s not as far-fetched it seems. Solar researchers and company executives think there’s a good chance the economics of the $42 billion industry will soon be disrupted by something called perovskites, a range of materials that can be used to harvest light when turned into a crystalline structure.

    The hope is that perovskites, which can be mixed into liquid solutions and deposited on a range of surfaces, could play a crucial role in the expansion of solar energy applications with cells as efficient as those currently made with silicon. One British company aims to have a thin-film perovskite solar cell commercially available by the end of 2018.

  5. Big oil is starting to challenge the biggest utilities in the race to erect wind turbines at sea.

    Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Statoil ASA and  Eni SpA are moving into multi-billion-dollar offshore wind farms in the North Sea and beyond. They’re starting to score victories against leading power suppliers including Dong Energy A/S and Vattenfall AB in competitive auctions for power purchase contracts, which have developed a specialty in anchoring massive turbines on the seabed.

    The oil companies have many reasons to move into the industry. They’ve spent decades building oil projects offshore, and that business is winding down in some areas where older fields have drained. Returns from wind farms are predictable and underpinned by government-regulated electricity prices. And fossil fuel executives want to get a piece of the clean-energy business as forecasts emerge that renewables will eat into their market.